Written Warning Letter Examples Including Employee Policies

Formal Employee Written Warning Letter Template

Under performing employees sometimes mandate hard decision making. If they don’t shape up after repeated verbal warnings, it’s time to get formal.

Issuing a formal warning letter is a part of HR best practices and helps protect employer against future dispute or legal consequences of firing an employee.

Our written warning template will make it easier for you to draft a formal letter that clearly outlines expectations and consequences. Continue below for a warning letter draft.

Example Written Warning Letter for Destruction of Company Property

October 29, 2009

Dear Mr. Stanly G. Graves:

You are being issued a formal written warning letter for destruction of company property. You acknowledged that you were aware of our company policy at your orientation on March 3, 2009. You also signed acknowledging that you received a copy of the company employee handbook on that same date which clearly outlines this policy.














Specifically, on October 23, 2009, at approximately 12:15 p.m., you were witnessed kicking a hole in the lunch room wall. After questioning you on October 24, 2009, you stated that you had just received news from a friend that they were no longer interested in a relationship.

Future violations of any company policy may result in additional disciplinary action, up to and including, possible termination.

Both parties have reviewed this document and agree that its contents fairly reflect their conversation.

Gary P. Bloomfield
Supervisor



Stanly G. Graves
Employee

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Complete the Open Blocks to Prepare an Employee Written Warning Notice




Date:      

From:      (Example: Mr. John S. Doe or John S. Doe)

To:           (Example: Ms. Jane F. Doe or Jane F. Doe)

Subject:  

********************



********************



********************

Date of the Offense


Date of the 2nd Offense
Example 2 Tardy Periods.


Date of the 3rd Offense
Example 3 Tardy Periods.


Date of the 4th Offense
Example 4 Tardy Periods.


Date of the 5th Offense
Example 5 Tardy Periods.


********************


Explain in written format the details of what happened, such as, what the employee said when you asked them about it. Whatever you write will be placed into the actual letter so be sure to put it in the proper format and make sure you are spelling things correctly.

Examples:

When I met with you on December 2, 2014, immediately after you arrived twenty-five minutes tardy you stated that you had over slept again. This is the third time you have been tardy since November 3, 2014. On all three times you stated you had over slept.

When asked whether you might have inappropriately touched Ms. Henderson on January 2, 2015, you stated that you did because you thought she was flirting with you.


********************

If Prior Discipline - Select the Type

Select the Date

**********

If 2 Prior Disciplines - Select the 2nd Type

Select the 2nd Date

**********

If 3 Prior Disciplines - Select the 3rd Type

Select the 3rd Date

********************

If Suspended Enter Start Date

Select number of days suspended

If Suspended Enter End Date

********************

The remainder of the actual letter will be based on the choices/selections you have already made.







Written Warning Letter for Absenteeism



March 29, 2009



Dear Mr. Peterson:


This written warning letter is being issued to you for violating our company's policy on excessive absenteeism, as outlined in our employee handbook.

Specifically, you had unscheduled absences on the following dates, January 4, 2010, February 15, 2010, February 22, 2010, and March 7, 2010. On February 26, 2010, you received a written counseling addressing the issue of the three previous unscheduled absent periods. Included in that written counseling it was stated that if you had another unscheduled absence, you will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including possible termination. On June 25, 2009, you acknowledged by your signature that you received our employee handbook.

Going forward it is very important that you are present for your scheduled shift unless you have made arrangements with your supervisor prior to the date scheduled. Merely notifying your supervisor that you will not be present for your scheduled, shift does not mean that you are authorized to be absent. Your supervisor must approve any requested absences in advance of the date you are not present.

If there is some underlying reason that you are unable to regularly be present for your shift you may want to consider the Family Medical Leave Act or any other state or federal program available. These types of programs must also be applied for and approved, not necessarily in advance, by a company official.

As a reminder, if you violate any additional company policies you will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including possible termination, as outlined in our employee handbook.


Gary P. Bloomfield
Supervisor



Mark G. Stevens
Employee





Sample Attendance Policy




This Company fully understands and recognizes the value of providing quality service to its customers. To ensure that quality, every associate is required and expected to be at work when scheduled.

When an associate is planning to be absent from any portion of a scheduled work day other than for previously scheduled vacation, that associate must notify their Supervisor no less than three (3) days prior to the absence. We also understand that there are unexpected circumstances (emergencies such as a death in the family) that may prohibit your ability to meet this requirement and in those cases it is critical that you present your request at the very earliest opportunity.

When an associate is unexpectedly unable to report to work, or is going to be late, that associate must contact their supervisor no later than two hours prior to the time that the associate is scheduled to be at work.

Failure to notify your supervisor of such absence may result in disciplinary action.

When an associate experiences unscheduled absences on consecutive days, that associate must contact their supervisor each day. Failure to notify your supervisor may result in disciplinary action. Failure to notify your supervisor for three (3) consecutive workdays will be considered your voluntary resignation. Written medical verification authorizing you to return to work will be required of any associate that exceeds an unscheduled absence for two (2) consecutive workdays.

Tardiness will not be tolerated. There is no grace period. Excessive tardiness may result in disciplinary action being taken. An associate will not be paid for the time he or she is tardy to work.

Absences for a death in the associate's immediate family (spouse, child, parent or grandparent), illness with a doctor's excuse or verifiable auto accident may be deemed "excused" absences by the Company for which no disciplinary action will be taken.






Sample Employee Written Warning Letter for Insubordination




Dear Ms. Gina R. Alexander:

This is a written warning letter being issued for Insubordination. You acknowledged that you were aware of our company policy on insubordination at your orientation on March 3, 2008. You also signed acknowledging that you received a copy of the company employee handbook on that same date which clearly outlines this policy.

Specifically, on June 12, 2008, you told your direct supervisor to knock it off when they were trying to correct your performance.

Future violations of our policy on insubordination, or any company policy, may result in additional disciplinary action, up to and including, possible termination.

Both parties have reviewed this document and agree that its contents fairly reflect their conversation.



Barry S. Gonzales
Supervisor



Gina R. Alexander
Employee






Written Warning Letter for Destruction of Company Property



October 29, 2009



Dear Mr. Stanly G. Graves:


You are being issued a formal written warning letter for destruction of company property. You acknowledged that you were aware of our company policy at your orientation on March 3, 2009. You also signed acknowledging that you received a copy of the company employee handbook on that same date which clearly outlines this policy.

Specifically, on October 23, 2009, at approximately 12:15 p.m., you were witnessed kicking a hole in the lunch room wall. After questioning you on October 24, 2009, you stated that you had just received news from a friend that they were no longer interested in a relationship.

Future violations of any company policy may result in additional disciplinary action, up to and including, possible termination.

Both parties have reviewed this document and agree that its contents fairly reflect their conversation.


Gary P. Bloomfield
Supervisor



Stanly G. Graves
Employee





Written Warning Letter for Careless Workmanship



June 12, 2008



Dear Mr. John Howard:

This written warning letter being provided to you for careless workmanship, which is a against company policy as pointed out in our employee handbook.

Specifically, on June 9, 2008, you attempted to turn an auto scrubber around in a part of the hall that was to narrow. That you initially denied that you were responsible for the hole. However, after additional questioning you admitted that you had caused the hole, and that you were in a hurry. You acknowledged that you had read, understood, and received a copy of the employee handbook on January 2, 2006. Included in our employee manual are consequences for violating this policy.

Mr. Howard, it is important to understand that you always properly operate not only the auto scrubber but all your equipment correctly. This equipment can not only cause damage to the facility but could also be dangerous to yourself, other employee's and visitors, if used in a careless way. Further it is important that if you should ever damage property in the future that you immediately report this to your supervisor.

Mr. Howard, please understand that any time in the future that you violate a company policy, for any reason, it may result in progressive discipline, up to and including possible dismissal.



Barry S. Gonzales
Supervisor



John Howard
Employee






Sample Warning Letter for Insubordination




June 1, 2011

Dear Mr. John E. Adams:

This warning letter is being issued to you for violating our company policy on insubordination as stated in our company employee handbook.

Specifically, on May 27, 2011, at approximately 9:35 am you refused to take direction from your supervisor when they directed you to shut down the conveyor belt you were working on and move to the loading dock to help with unloading a delivery. Although you finally did follow their direction it wasn't until they made three separate requests to do so.

Mr. Adams, it is important that you follow your supervisors direction at all times. The only exception to this would be if you were directed to perform a task that was unethical, illegal, or unsafe.

In the future if you fail to follow any company policy you will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including possible termination.

Sincerely,



Robert R. Smith
Supervisor



John E. Adams
Employee

My signature does not necessarily indicate that I am in agreement with the above statements; however, it does indicate that I was informed of the contents of this letter.






Written Warning Letter for Insubordination



June 15 29, 2009



Dear Mr. Jon D. Albertson:


You are being issued this written warning letter for insubordination, which is a direct violation of our employee policy manual.

On June 17, 2009, at approximately 2:15 p.m. you stuck your tongue out at your supervisor after he had stopped and spoke with you. Your supervisor witnessed this action. When you were questioned about this action you stated that you wished that your supervisor would mind his own business and that you were fully aware of what you needed to do.

Mr. Albertson, it is very important that you respect and take direction from your supervisor at all times. The only exception to this would be if your supervisor is directing you to perform a task that is illegal, immoral or unsafe. In the event you are directed to perform a task that meets one or more of these situations you are required to bring it to the attention of senior management immediately.

If in the future you violate a company policy or work rule you may receive additional discipline up to and including possible dismissal.


Gary P. Bloomfield
Supervisor



Jon D. Albertson
Employee







Employee Written Warning Letters



Occasionally an employees performance isn't up to par and management or Human Resources need to write an employee written warning letter. This letter will state the details of the infraction and what is expected to be done to improve the employee's work ethics.

Letters of this nature should always be carefully written so as to not demean the employee but rather, to address the inappropriate behavior or work ethic. Every effort should be taken to ensure that the employee recognizes the required course of action and to ensure that the employee sees that they can rectify the situation.

In most companies, if an employee gets three employee written warning letters in their term of employment, they are terminated. Employees should make every effort to ensure that if they want to continue to be employed with the company, they follow the instructions to keep their job position.

These letters can be encouraging while still reprimanding an employee or they can be demeaning. Employers who seek to encourage an employee will be wise to keep this thought in mind when drafting such a letter.

A written warning can serve as a teaching tool to the employee in helping them to see why the company does things in a specific manner. It can also serve to notify the employee that they need more training in an effort to better their employment opportunity.

A good company will offer some solid pointers to help the employee improve their work ethic or behavior. Warning letters should never be given without first a verbal warning being given. This letter will become a permanent part of the employees file and this should be noted in some way in the employee written warning letter. Many employers also set a date by which time the employee should have improved the behavior.






I Had To Learn To Write An Employee Written Warning Letter



I was trying to write an employee written warning letter because I had someone on my team have an issue that I needed to let them know I didn't appreciate. It was against company policy and that was something I wasn't willing to put up with because it could come down on me and get me into trouble. All in all I wanted to make sure that I had what I needed in the way of instructions to come up with a letter that I knew would do the job.

I had to make sure, as well, that my letter that contained the warning stuck with company policy and was also legal. This is why I paid for someone to help me come up with a template that I could use to craft a letter for each time this happened. Since I'm fairly new to my leadership position I was glad to be able to get things in order and start working with what I could to show that I was good at what I do. All in all I've been learning a lot and think I can continue to do well into the future!




Related Topics


    *    Understanding Workplace Harassment Law

   *    Employee Discipline Form

    *    What An Employee Discipline Policy Should Consist Of

   *    Employee Investigations

   *    Warning letter Notice

   *    Employee Counseling

   *    Employment Law

   *    Progressive Discipline Process

   *    Progressive Discipline Policy

   *    Employee Counseling Form

   *    Prevent Employee Theft

   *    Counseling a Problem Employee

   *    Absenteeism - What are you doing about it?

   *    Disciplinary Action

   *    Employee Warning

   *    Employee Warning Form

   *    Disciplinary Procedures

   *    Writing a Warning

   *    How to Deal with Employee Conflict!

   *    Termination Letters

   *    Sleeping at Work?

   *    Employee Warning Notice

   *    Warning Letters for Insubordination.

   *    Instructions on How To Write a Warning Letter

   *    Discipline Form

   *    Warning Letter for Insubordination

   *    Warning Letter for Disrespectful Behavior

   *    Warning Letter for Absenteeism

   *    Warning Letter Examples

   *    Warning Letter for Tardiness

   *    Sample Employment Termination Letter

   *    Another Warning Letter

   *    Example Of a Reprimand Letter

   *    Employee Discipline Form

    *    Free Employee Discipline Software

     *    When To Issue Discipline in the Workplace?

    *    Warning for Tardiness

    *    Warning for Disrespect

    *    Warning for Insubordination

    *    Warning for Misconduct

    *    Warning for Stealing

    *    Understanding The Different Types Of Employee Discipline

    *    Things To Remember When Creating A Final Written Warning Letter

    *    Issuing A 1st Written Warning Before Deciding To Terminate

Written Warning

Employee Written Warning Form

Employee Written Warning Letter and Form

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employee written warning letter example

Knowing When To Give An Employee Written Warning




As a new employer, you may still be navigating the waters of how to deal with your employees. What do you need to do if your employee needs disciplinary action? One way of dealing with such a situation is through an employee written warning. However, you should not go dishing out written warnings just for the sake of it, as you will need to establish discipline pattern. Part of this is knowing when to given an employee written warning.

Take a look at the company policy. A lot of companies and firms have sections that have guidelines and policies when it comes to dealing with employee misconduct.

Before issuing a written warning, it important to note whether a verbal warning was given first. Written warnings should only come after several verbal warnings have been given. The best way to deal with employee misconduct is by following the pattern of discipline and in this case it requires that you should have covered all verbal warnings before moving on to written ones.

Is there a chain of command? One factor that determines whether a manager can hand out a written warning is if there is anyone else who can deal with the matter. In a larger office, there is usually one employee who is responsible for all discipline cases. It helps to have a chain of command where the manager can delegate discipline tasks to someone else.

It is important that you stop to think about what kind of impact the warning letter will have on the employee as well as the department as a whole. Will it instill fear? Will it instigate even more misconduct? Will it lower the employee's morale and productivity? All these need to be taken into account.

It will also help to compare this scenario with other similar ones. At times, you may not know how to deal with a particular case and it would be to your benefit to see how a similar case was handled. You can then apply the guidelines that were used in that situation to handle your current one.

Something may have led to the employee's indiscipline so it is important to not make any decisions based on a single incident alone. Observe the employee's pattern of behavior. Is it an isolated event? Has the employee gotten verbal warnings on the same matter before? Is there something going on in their personal life? If you are unsure about how to handle a particular situation, then you can keep tabs on that employee and secure proof that he/she is involved in bad activity. The proof is to ensure that the employee has nothing to use against you in court should they decide to use the written warning as misconduct or unfair treatment on your part.

Some companies even have policies that state that there may be several written warnings before one final one is given. If the employee continues with the misconduct even after the last warning, he/she will be fired.






How To Deal With An Employee Written Warning Letter!




Getting written up at work can be a frightening experience. Sometimes you may not even realize that you are doing anything wrong before you get a warning about it. However, it important to remember that employee written warnings are not the end of the world. As long as you change whatever behavior got you in trouble in the first place, you should be able to continue with your job without any future problems.

employee written wwarning letter for tardiness



If you do get an written warning, it is important to handle it in a mature and responsible way. First, if the warning requires a signature acknowledging that you received it, sign it and return it to the HR department right away. Sometimes employees are hesitant to sign their warnings because they see it as admitting to wrongdoing and are afraid that it will be held against them at a future date.

However, the signature is really just an acknowledgment that you read the warning and won't be used against you in the future. In fact, refusing to sign would reflect far more negatively on you than just signing the paper since it makes it look like you are unwilling to cooperate.

Next, you should carefully consider the content of the warning. Written warnings are usually only given if you are violating one of the company policies. If you feel like you weren't doing anything wrong, it may be worth reading the company handbook or sitting down with an HR specialist to discuss the situation. You need to be sure you thoroughly understand the problem so that you can correct it.

You also need to think about ways that you can fix the problem. For instance, if you got written up for always being late to work, you should try to brainstorm some ways that you could get to work on time. You might try setting your alarm for an earlier time, going to bed earlier at night so you don't sleep in or skipping your morning stop at the coffee shop so you don't get stuck waiting in line. Coming up with an actionable plan for how to fix the problem will help you avoid any future issues.

Also, it is important not to harbor any ill will or resentment toward your boss or anyone in the HR department. Chances are they are just doing their jobs and it is nothing personal. Written warnings are just as uncomfortable to give as they are to receive, so it is unlikely they would have given you one if you didn't do something to deserve it. Being mature enough to acknowledge that you did something wrong and to take steps to correct the problem without holding a grudge can go a long way toward maintaining a harmonious workplace.

Getting an employee written warning can be an upsetting experience. However, as long as you keep a cool head and react appropriately, it shouldn't be a big deal. Simply sign the notice, think about what you did wrong, find ways to correct the problem and you will be well on your way to getting back in your boss' good graces again.






What Is An Employee Written Warning Letter?




An employee written warning letter is a method of putting an employee on notice that they have acted improperly in the workplace, or have performed their workplace duties improperly. A written warning usually follows a verbal warning, which in effect, elevates the situation to a more serious nature.

employee written warning letter for insubordination



In one sense, is seems that all of this would not be necessary, but there are situations where an employee gets into trouble, either innocently or on purpose. It could be that the employee is bothering their neighbors, or in some instances, they are actually rude or even threatening to a co-worker.

Warnings can also relate to the quality of work that is being done. If a supervisor sees that the worker is purposely not performing at a level that is acceptable, it can be pointed out to the employee what is expected of them. This should be done professionally and in detail so that the employee agrees that he or she understands the procedures that are required and agrees to them.

A verbal warning is the first step in a scenario of steps to either get the worker on board with what is going on in the workplace, or eventually terminate employment if things do not improve. When a warning of any kind is issued, it should be communicated to the employee in terms like, "This is a verbal warning." Then a specific reason should be given to the employee so that it is clear what the warning is being issued for.

Companies will have a schedule of warnings that an employee can receive before a situation is elevated to the next level. For example, a worker could get two verbal warnings, and then any further warnings would be written. Then if an employee written warning is received two times, it would be grounds for termination of employment.

Companies who hire a large number of lower paid and non-skilled employees just about have to have some kind of method to keep order in the workplace. When people work closely with each other there are going to be times when people will just not get along. A good supervisor will see this and either move the antagonistic employees to different stations where they are apart, or if that is not possible issue verbal warnings and employee written warning letters as needed.

Human resources is the backup for dealing with employees who do consistently get out of line. It is not that anyone is trying to be mean or disagreeable with employees, but some people, for some reason, have a lot of difficulty "socializing" properly in the workplace. Of course there are all kinds of personalities in society, and in a large workplace when they are all thrown together, there can be conflicts.

In most cases, people usually try to get along and do their jobs, but there are various levels of maturity and consideration that have to come into play. Some actions cannot be tolerated, however, such as the young man who wanted to show off in a call center, how long of a flame his lighter would create, which of course was a fire hazard. That action earned him a verbal warning.






Utilizing An Employee Written Warning Properly!




An employee written warning is simply a way to put an employee on notice that there is behavior or a work result that is not up to standards. A written warning will usually follow a verbal warning of one or two times, based upon the company policy.



These warnings and the possibility of them being given are gone over in an initial, new employee meeting, so that workers understand that there are rules and standards that the employer expects to be followed. In most instances warnings are for flagrant adverse behavior or woefully inadequate work results.

Workplace environments can be made up of large numbers of people working together and it is inevitable that there will be conflicts of some sort, minor or otherwise. This is why it is important for the employer to set standards right up front when new workers are hired, as to what types of conduct are allowed and not allowed.

Basically anything that causes disruption in the workforce can be cause for issuing a warning. Verbal warnings are used initially, but if the conduct persists there might be another verbal, and then the process would move on into a written warning. An employee written warning has the effect of elevating the behavior or work results to a higher level where the employee might be taken aside and counseled as to the consequences of his or her conduct or production at work.

When most people reach the written warning stage, the start to understand what is and what is not going to be tolerated. They begin to see that this is not their playground and if the want to keep their job, they will have to conform to acceptable behavior.

Sometimes people just do stupid things too, such as a young man wanted to show off how far his new lighter would be able to shoot a flame. When he demonstrated the flame to his coworkers, largely without anyone's consent, a supervisor immediately called him in and gave a verbal warning, since everything around the young man was flammable.

In other cases you have egos that clash, disputes on radios, noise, rude remarks, and any of a number of things that people get irritated by. Sometimes it helps to move people apart who are prone to argue and have differences, but some people irritate others no matter where they go.

Verbal and written warnings are also the legal way to go when dealing with errant employees, as rather than just fire somebody just because they are a sore spot in the group doesn't cut it in modern HR etiquette. It may be that the employee is going through serious problems at home, or someone is very ill, that is causing the poor behavior or performance.

The idea is to show the employee why the warnings are being given and then to illustrate what kind of behavior will keep them from getting any more. A good supervisor or manager will build the employee up and share with them what they can become if they don't get any more warnings.




How To Get An Employee Written Warning Put Together!




You have to learn about employee written warning options if you have anyone that works for you. Otherwise, you may end up having a lot of trouble and not being able to do much about it. This way, you have proof that you talked to them and they know there are consequences for actions they take.



There are many places online where you can get a template for this kind of warning, so you may want to start there. Think about getting an office program if you don't have one to use templates with so that you can alter them to show your company name and the like. Also be sure that you have the language checked over if you want to make sure it's all legal. There are many great options when it comes to office styled programs, and you can usually get a lot of use out of free templates or those you pay for.

When you are going to pay someone else to write the warning for you, include directions on how it should look. You should outsource this work if you or those you know can't really do any writing that will make sense. You need to be careful when it comes to what you say on the letter, because that will end in you having a little problem if the language is vague or the warning doesn't make a lot of sense. Think about having it at least proofread and edited if you're going to write it.

Any employee that gets a warning will need a space where they can sign a copy that you keep and then you can copy that to give to them. That way, you both can know that they understood and are bound by the agreement. You want to have a rule where if they get a certain number of write-ups, you can expect to lose a job. You'll want to make it clear on the warning where they stand and when they are going to have to deal with a firing if they're not careful. You want to always let people know exactly what's going on with their employment to be fair.

If you have an employee that's not following the rules, that's one reason to have notes, but if everyone is always breaking a rule then it may be time to rethink it. A lot of companies have policies in place that make it tough to work around an issue. That's why you want to make certain that you're working with a company that can give clear and easy to follow rules. If things turn out to where warnings are always going out, analyze why this is happening and fix it.

An employee written warning is a smart idea to have worked on right away. The idea is to be prepared for people messing up. In the end you can use this advice to get you started on creating a warning system.




When To Use The Employee Written Warning And When Not To!




Most employees try to do a good job at all times when working, and should be praised on a regular basis, however, there are always going to be those that try to get by without doing their assigned tasks, or do poor work whenever they can get away with it. For those workers that you wish to keep and train, there are a variety of ways to help them improve, and that should be your main goal. For the employees that you really believe would be better working elsewhere, it's best to start documenting their work history in preparation for dismissal and this is usually done with a employee written warning.

Discipline Warning Letter



Written Warnings Shouldn't Be Taken Lightly By Anyone

Warnings to employees should always carry a certain amount of weight, and should never be given out in revenge, or casually. They should go into a workers permanent file that will follow them the entire time they are with the company. The employee should know exactly what caused the warning and how to improve to avoid another in the future, and there should also be an explanation of the consequences of receiving another for the same offense as well.

Employees Should Always Know Their Job Duties And Description

When a new person is hired on at the company, they should always know exactly what is expected of them at work. This can also include being on time to work, lunches and breaks, as this is an important part of many jobs, especially those that deal with customers that need to be helped in a timely manner. There should be strict policies in force for any dangerous activities, including working under the influence of drugs or alcohol, operating machinery in an unsafe way, threatening fellow employees, and theft of company property.

Some offenses are eligible for immediate termination, depending on the safety and severity of the action.

Bad Attitudes Can Be The Hardest To Change

One of the most difficult problems in any work place are those employees that have continual bad attitudes. They cause others to be the same around them, and can chase away customers over time as well. Sometimes they are the result of problems at home, but they need to be left there and not brought to work. Many times they arise from a missed promotion, a manager brought in from another location, or some other problem that could be fixed by having a private meeting to air grievances. If that doesn't work, there are counseling, medications, and other ways to handle the problem. If nothing works or the employee refuses to change, it might be time to ask them to leave the company, or risk being forced out using the company policies as a guide.

Using the employee written warning should always be one of the last resorts used with employees, unless of course you've basically decided to terminate them legally from their jobs. It's always better to use training, meetings, goal setting and other methods to help otherwise good workers thrive and be happy at their jobs.




Give an Employee Written Warning after Verbal Ones Fail To Rein In Discipline!




Discipline is a must in any business enterprise and must have employees confirming to all the rules of the business, whether it be in attendance, application of skills, behavior with associates and fellow workers, honesty and loyalty to the enterprise where they are employed. Employers and mangers need to take steps to see that this discipline is maintained at all times, and take steps to correct poor employee behavior.

Employee Disicpline Letter Template



Employees who do not adhere to the required norms can be detrimental to the growth of the business and cause disruption in the smooth functioning of a business. Troublesome employees need to be warned about their behavior and asked to correct it. In most cases, verbal warnings by properly designated officials should be enough to keep such instances in check. The severity of the offense can also determine the action that needs to be taken. When the instances of indiscipline continue, it then becomes time to issue an employee written warning of his or her failure to adhere to the required discipline. Before the extreme step of firing or discharging an employee is considered it is necessary, by law in most countries, to give erring employees a number of verbal warnings and follow them up with at least three written warnings before a discharge notice is issued. Verbal warnings must also be recorded in the file of the employee and the employee made aware of it. Every instance of indiscipline must be documented.

In most cases, the direct supervisor is the right person to give both verbal and written warnings, even though documentation may be carried out by legal or HR personnel. It is always advisable to issue all such warnings in private, so that other staff and co-workers are not directly aware of such warnings having been given. An employee written warning must contain all information about the time and occurrence of the undisciplined behavior or action, rules that have been contravened and ask the employee to correct the behavior, and may, if necessary, list out the likely action that can follow in case of intransigence. The employee must be asked to give an explanation which can be verbal or written, but needs to be also documented.

It becomes necessary when such written warnings are issued, that the immediate supervisor constantly follow up with the employee and encourage any positive behavior or suggest further improvement. Written warnings have to be followed only after sufficient verbal warnings and unless the discipline is major or invites criminal action, this process must not be short circuited.

It is very important that before any warnings are issued, all the facts in the case must be brought to light. This is especially important where the indiscipline involves other co-workers, as personal biases need to be ruled out. A complaint lodged by a co-worker must allow the person complained also to give their own version of events. This is especially important in cases of sexual harassment. Discharge of employees for indiscipline can at times lead to legal cases, and it is important that the facts of a case be properly recorded and pass legal scrutiny.




When To Use The Employee Written Warning And When Not To!



Most employees try to do a good job at all times when working, and should be praised on a regular basis, however, there are always going to be those that try to get by without doing their assigned tasks, or do poor work whenever they can get away with it. For those workers that you wish to keep and train, there are a variety of ways to help them improve, and that should be your main goal. For the employees that you really believe would be better working elsewhere, it's best to start documenting their work history in preparation for dismissal and this is usually done with a employee written warning. good leadership skills

Written Warnings Shouldn't Be Taken Lightly By Anyone



Warnings to employees should always carry a certain amount of weight, and should never be given out in revenge, or casually. They should go into a workers permanent file that will follow them the entire time they are with the company. The employee should know exactly what caused the warning and how to improve to avoid another in the future, and there should also be an explanation of the consequences of receiving another for the same offense as well.

Employees Should Always Know Their Job Duties And Description



When a new person is hired on at the company, they should always know exactly what is expected of them at work. This can also include being on time to work, lunches and breaks, as this is an important part of many jobs, especially those that deal with customers that need to be helped in a timely manner. There should be strict policies in force for any dangerous activities, including working under the influence of drugs or alcohol, operating machinery in an unsafe way, threatening fellow employees, and theft of company property. Some offenses are eligible for immediate termination, depending on the safety and severity of the action.

Bad Attitudes Can Be The Hardest To Change



One of the most difficult problems in any work place are those employees that have continual bad attitudes. They cause others to be the same around them, and can chase away customers over time as well. Sometimes they are the result of problems at home, but they need to be left there and not brought to work. Many times they arise from a missed promotion, a manager brought in from another location, or some other problem that could be fixed by having a private meeting to air grievances. If that doesn't work, there are counseling, medications, and other ways to handle the problem. If nothing works or the employee refuses to change, it might be time to ask them to leave the company, or risk being forced out using the company policies as a guide.

Using the employee written warning should always be one of the last resorts used with employees, unless of course you've basically decided to terminate them legally from their jobs. It's always better to use training, meetings, goal setting and other methods to help otherwise good workers thrive and be happy at their jobs.