Minnesota Labor Law
Quick Facts!



It is important that both employers and employees are aware of the Minnesota labor law and regulations that govern their workplace. Many times a lot of money and time can be saved if workers and work givers are only aware of their rights and responsibilities. Therefore, understanding the basic laws contained in the department of labor regulations is essential.















The Minnesota labor law is concerned with aspects such as minimum wage, overtime, employee rights, and laws concerning minors in the workplace. Before looking at these rights, it is essential to understand that a difference exists between state and federal laws. Federal laws generally supersede state regulations.

If the minimum rate is lower than the federal rate…

In the case of minimum wage, for instance, state regulations can allow a worker to earn more. If the minimum rate is lower than the federal rate, however, then the higher federal rate will apply instead. These regulations state that larger companies' minimum wages should be higher than smaller companies' rates. The exact fixed rates can be checked online.

They further state that workers must be paid overtime after working forty-eight consecutive hours in a seven-day week. The rate of payment should be one and a half times the regular pay. Employers are not required to pay this higher rate on holidays though. They are entitled to if they wish to do so but it is not required of them. Federal regulations, on the other hand say that a worker must be paid overtime after working forty consecutive hours in a seven-day week.

A boss can therefore not require someone to attend training or a meeting and not include this time spent as hours worked.

It might be necessary to be aware of this fact. It is also necessary to be aware that the time one should be paid for includes meetings and training that takes place on the employer's premises. According to Minnesota labor law, a boss can therefore not require someone to attend training or a meeting and not include this time spent as hours worked.

Employers are not required to give rest breaks throughout a workday though. Only if a worker is on site for more than eight consecutive hours does a rest break become necessary. Workers are allowed restroom breaks every four hours though. The details concerning these aspects of the Minnesota Department of labor can usually be found in an employee handbook.

A child may therefore not start working at six in the morning, or continue working after nine at night.

Another aspect that should be taken note of, concerns minors. The Minnesota labor law states that children under the age of fourteen are not allowed to be employed. Children of the ages fourteen and up are further restricted in the amount of time they are allowed to work. Generally, children under the age of sixteen may only work between seven am and nine pm.

A child may therefore not start working at six in the morning, or continue working after nine at night. For those aged sixteen and over, Minnesota labor law states that working time should not stretch beyond eleven at night. These regulations are in place to ensure that children are not taken advantage of and that they do not stay away from school. Overall, it is important for everyone to be aware of their rights and responsibilities concerning their workplace.

Thank you and may God bless you!

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