State Department of Labor Regulations

Minnesota through Wyoming



How important is department of labor regulations training to your business?

Everything from trying to understand the law as it applies to exempt versus non exempt employees, as well as, independent contractor versus a regular employee.















Making a mistake in either of the above examples could cost you thousands of dollars. If you’re like most businesses today thousands of dollars for an expense that is not necessary may be just enough to put you out of business.

On this website "Good Leadership Skills" I have provide almost all the State's Labor Regulations. The home page for this information can be found on our Labor Law Training webpage.

See below for information on eighteen states.




Minnesota Labor Law – Quick Facts





New Jersey Department of Labor Regulations

The New Jersey department of labor regulations addresses many of the common factors that employers are involved in within the state. The division that administers the department of labor regulations for New Jersey is The Division of Wage and Hour Compliance. For the most part nothing within the department of labor regulations should surprise anyone since they are fairly straight forward. Everything from the minimum wage to the apparel industry is covered by this Division.

At the time of this writing the minimum wage was $7.25 per hour, which became effective on July 24, 2009. This is not uncommon for any state to have a minimum wage established. With the exception of jobs that require little to no experience this wage is most likely too low to attract qualified help. The New Jersey department of labor; however, also requires that no matter what you decide to pay your employees they are entitled to overtime for any hours over forty in one week. There are some exemptions to this requirement and you should inquire directly with New Jersey’s Division of Wage and Hour Compliance. Of course overtime means that whatever the employee’s normal hourly rate is you would pay that plus one half times more.

Should an employer withhold these from an employee…

The New Jersey department of labor also covers unpaid or withheld wages that an employer may want to consider holding back to cover breakage, spillage, or cash shortages. The law specifically does not allow an employer to withhold these from an employees pay. Should an employer withhold these from an employee the employee can file a claim with the Division of Wage and Hour Compliance. This is why it is important that you spell these types of issues within your employee handbook so that if you are withholding wages for some other type of legal reason you will be covered.

department of labor regulations



Another issue covered under the New Jersey labor regulations are fringe benefits. Although New Jersey does not mandate that you provide any fringe benefits it does insure that if you do you administer them correctly. This means that if you agreed to provide things like vacation, paid holidays, or sick time you must pay them when the employee is eligible. Again, having this clearly outlined within your employee handbook is a wise choice so that it will be very easy to provide the Division with what your policy is and that the employee knows. Trust me when I tell you that I have had to do this a number of times during my career in states like California.

Since I am very familiar with the health care industry I understand why…

The New Jersey department of labor also has provided some allowances for mandatory overtime in the health care industry. Although there are always conditions attached the law does allow for it. The health care industry is the one that has this exception. Since I am very familiar with the health care industry I understand why this would be something that is necessary. In times of a crisis such as extreme weather or disasters it is critical to be able to require employees to stay on duty. Now it is important to understand that employees need rest and you must also consider this.

The one area that is different under the New Jersey department of labor regulations is that they provided guidelines within the apparel industry. This is covered by the New Jersey Apparel Registration Act. This Act requires that anyone engaged in the apparel or embroidery industry to register in New Jersey. This includes anyone or any business outside the state doing business inside the state. It does not allow for businesses to have employees working from home in this industry. Make that type of thing crystal clear in your employee handbook so that there is no question in the minds of your employees.

They specify the number of hours of work, the type of industries permitted to employ minors…

Although there are many more rules within New Jersey’s employee law the final element within this article would be the employment of minors. In New Jersey a minor is anyone under 18 years of age. This particular part of the department of labor regulations is covered under The New Jersey Child Labor Law and Regulations. They specify the number of hours of work, the type of industries permitted to employ minors and the issuance of employment certificates. Of course certain industries rely on minors to get them through periods where business is very high. I hate to beat a dead horse but make sure you cover the hiring of minors in your employee handbook no matter if you employ them or not.






New York State Department of Labor Regulations


The New York State department of labor regulations becomes very important from the time an employer begins the recruitment process to all the way through until the employee leaves the company. Therefore, if you are a business owner, or in a leadership role, it is critical that you understand the department of labor regulations completely. Remember that ignorance is no excuse for violating the law. In addition to information you can get from this article it is important that you visit New York’s Labor Departments website, and consult with a legal professional.

Under New York State department of labor regulations a business owner is not obligated to hire the most qualified individual for any position. However, they are not permitted to violate the state or federal law on discrimination. The laws on discrimination make it illegal to not hire someone based on certain characteristics that are not job related, such as, race, religion, sex, age, national origin, and more. Violating the discrimination laws will end you up in a legal battle quicker than you can say “Judgment for the plaintiff in the amount of $1,000,000!”

Anyone over the age of forty falls into the age for age discrimination…

In addition to having no specific rules against hiring an individual except for discriminatory reasons, New York State department of labor regulations doesn’t get involved in a business owner’s promotion process either. However, I would consult with a legal employment professional since it is easier than you think to be charged with discrimination. After all anyone over the age of forty falls into the age for age discrimination. As I mentioned earlier about discrimination the average legal settlement for employee law suits begin at around $100,000 and keep going up to over one million dollars.

One of the most prominent violations of discrimination law is race. Unfortunately it is not only a problem in the United States but also the world. As a business owner it only makes sense to hire the most qualified even if you are not required to. By using a little common sense one would understand that a company can only stay in business if they are profitable. Now I know that there are some other reasons that you may not want to hire the most qualified, such as the person is arrogant. If you are certain that there personality is one that just will not mix with your workforce I can understand. But again, be very careful that it is not for a discriminatory reason.

Do you plan on having children?

During the interview process New York State department of labor regulations allows an employer is not permitted to ask questions that are not job related. Some of these questions would be like;

Are you married?

Do you plan on getting married?

Do you have children?

Do you plan on having children?

Have you ever been arrested?

Do you attend church?

How old are you?

Do you own a house?

What type of car do you have?


On the other hand New York State department of labor regulations permits you to ask if a candidate has been convicted of a crime. You can also ask a candidate if they would be able to carry out the essential functions of the job with or without reasonable accommodations. Of course you must be able to define what the essential functions of the job are. I can guarantee that this will be the very first question they will ask, unless you have included them in your job description which I strongly recommend.

The key here is that you are only giving true and accurate information…

Finally according to the New York State department of labor regulations, a previous employer is permitted to give information to an employer conducting a reference check on a potential employee. The key here is that you are only giving true and accurate information. It you state that the employee did something wrong you better have good proof to back up your statement. Because of this most employers will limit the information they provide to only dates of employment.

Again, the Good Leadership Skills website is dedicated to providing you with good business information but they are not legal professionals. It is very important that you do your own research. Many good reputable companies provide excellent employee handbook templates that can make it very easy to prepare and product an employee handbook. I would try and limit my search to only those that have been written or developed by an employment attorney.




North Dakota Department of Labor Regulations

North Dakota department of labor regulations is an employment at will state. An employment at will is where either the employer or the employee can terminate their employment relationship at anytime with or without a reason. Just like any law there are exceptions to this. Some of those exceptions would be if the employee is under a collective bargaining agreement or any other employment contract. Other reasons would be that an employer is prohibited from any type of discriminatory practice against individuals for such things as race, age, national origin, religion, disability, color, or sex. Please check with an employment law attorney if you have any questions about what other protections an employee may have.

North Dakota department of labor regulations also prohibits an employer from asking certain types of questions during an employment interview that have nothing to do with the position. Although it would take forever to list all questions that may be prohibited I will just give you a couple of examples;

Have you ever been arrested for anything?

Are you married or are-you going to get married?

Do you have any children or do you plan on having children?

Tell me where were you born?

Have you ever been arrested for anything?

As you can see asking any of these questions does not have anything to do with the specific job you have. Yes, there are always exceptions to everything, but as a general rule you would not want to ask any of them, unless you can tie it directly to the position. This does not include that you want to know so that your health insurance rates over all will not go up. That has nothing to do with the position.

On the other hand North Dakota department of labor regulations does allow for you to ask questions like;

Have you ever been convicted of a crime?

If you are offered a position would you be able to provide evidence that you are permitted to work in the United States?

If you are offered a position would you be able to perform the duties without, or with, reasonable accommodations?

Although some may argue that an employment at will state like the North Dakota department of labor regulations has is jeopardized by having an employment handbook, I would suggest you give it some consideration.

Although some may argue that an employment at will state like the North Dakota department of labor regulations has is jeopardized by having an employee handbook, I would suggest you give it some consideration. Of course before you produce and publish one for your company, make sure you check with a department of labor regulations attorney. In the end you may not really care since you would not want to end an employment relationship unless you have good and reasonable cause to do so. For example it would not matter if you were in an employment at will state and someone steals money out of the till and you can prove it, they are worthy of termination. Or if someone yells at a customer in a degrading fashion and you have evidence, the person is worthy of termination. So check it out with a department of labor regulations attorney or you can find excellent employment handbook templates software that can provide great language covering all these types of situations.

North Dakota department of labor regulations falls under the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission when it comes to sexual harassment in the workplace. Sexual harassment is any unwelcomed sexual advances, whether verbal or physical. In addition, it is' illegal if an employer suggests that if you have a sexual relationship with them or the employee will receive a negative or positive consequence. This is referred to as "Ouid Pro Quo" or this for that. Finally, an employer can be held responsible for a hostile work environment if they permit an overly sexual work environment. My suggestion would be to always error on the side of caution in this sue happy environment that we live in today.

As I mentioned earlier it is critical that you do your own research. This information is only meant to assist you and not act as a legal guide. I would insure that I check with a reputable department of labor regulations attorney or they also have excellent legal assistance online through a number of websites.




Oklahoma Department of Labor Regulations


Oklahoma department of labor regulations like many other states has protections against discrimination in the workplace. But like those other states they have additional protections for certain additional categories. Just to clarify Oklahoma prohibits the discrimination of those forty or older, for national origin or ancestry, for physical or mental disabilities, for gender, for race, for religion, for genetic testing information, for military service, and for a smoker or non smoker. As you can see this list is quite extensive and may be considered easy to violate if you don't treat everyone with respect. At some point we will all fall into one of those categories!

Even hints at discrimination can be a violation such as making certain types of statements that could be understood the wrong way. Making a statement such as we need a stronger workforce could be understood as needing more males. This followed up with hiring more male employees may land you in trouble. Employers for the most part can hire the applicant that they wish provided they do not violate the Oklahoma department of labor regulations in the process, i.e., discriminating against someone for any of the categories mentioned above!

If you placed a working condition that someone had to weigh a certain amount…

Under the Oklahoma department of labor regulations even placing certain conditions on an applicant could be mistakenly seen as discrimination. For instance if you placed a working condition that someone had to weigh a certain amount based on their height it may be seen as discriminating against the female population. Something else that an employer may do that may be considered a discriminatory practice would be to only advertise in places that one segment of the population may look at. Let's say that you only advertise in a Baptist Church and hold a government contract. This will get you in trouble!

Oklahoma department of labor regulations dictates when you must pay someone that you either terminate or that quits voluntarily. In both cases an employer has until the following payday to issue them a paycheck. This is very liberal considering that states like California require you to issue a paycheck at the time of termination for an employee being discharged. On the other hand if an employer offers vacation pay they must issue a paycheck to the employee for anytime accrued. This is one of the most questioned things when an employee leaves the' company. This is why it is so very important to make sure how an employee accrues vacation time is spelled out in the employee handbook. Most Good Leadership Skills software do a very good job of offering language that helps.

The employer can determine when that will occur so that it does not disrupt the business…

Most states allow some time for employees to go and vote during local or national elections. Oklahoma department of labor regulations is no different. In Oklahoma the law permits an employee up to two hours of unpaid time to go and vote. However, the employer can determine when that will occur so that it does not disrupt the business. The employer can also adjust an employee's schedule so that it will allow them time either before or after their shift begins or ends. As an example if an employee's shift begins or ends at least three hours before or after the polls open or close the employer is not required to provide time off.

The Oklahoma department of labor regulations does not provide for any additional requirements to the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act regarding overtime rules. It is a good idea that you have a poster in an area that employees have access to. In fact it is a requirement if you have a certain number of employees. I would also refer to this provision in your employee handbook. In fact most Good Leadership Skills software providers will offer the federally required posters so that you will be in compliance with the state and federal department of labor regulations. The reputable companies offering Good Leadership Skills will also notify and update laws as they change which is a huge benefit.

Please understand that Oklahoma department of labor regulations and other department of labor regulations change frequently and I can't stress enough that you must consult with a legal professional such as an employment attorney for specific language, interpretations, and requirements for your specific state like Oklahoma. What is published today could be changed tomorrow by a simple court ruling or a legislative body casting a vote.





Oregon Department of Labor Regulations

Oregon department of labor regulations like New York State labor regulations, protects employees that are eighteen years or older from discrimination. Most states and federal law protects employees forty years old or older. In so many ways it makes it very difficult since almost all an employer’s staff will be eighteen or over. So the bottom line is that everyone in essences is protected against age discrimination. Although I am not a department of labor regulations attorney nor do I do department of labor regulations training (unless you count this website as department of labor regulations training), I believe the department of labor regulations cancels itself out.

On the other hand Oregon labor regulations does protect other groups of people like, race, color, religion, gender, marital status, national origin, pregnancy, childbirth, pregnancy related conditions, physical and mental disabilities, and genetic testing information. For the most part I don’t believe any employers set out to intentionally discriminate against someone. I think they end up making very stupid and untimely comments trying to be cute. As an example an employer may make a comment like women complain way too much! This sounds innocent enough but could land you with a gender discrimination complaint. The bad news is that the complaint won’t come up until you take some type of negative employment action against a woman.

They might say something like boy that would cost a lot of money to modify…

Another one of those topics that can be misunderstood is when an employer may reference having to make an accommodation for someone that is disabled. They might say something like boy that would cost a lot of money to modify this work area for someone in a wheel chair. It may have even been a casual remark that didn’t even reference anyone in particular. However, the first time someone in your staff becomes disabled you may be fighting an uphill battle. Employees may not remember much but I can tell you that they certainly remember comments that matter. We all do! Oregon department of labor regulations will protect those groups of people mentioned above from discrimination if there is any hint. Even if you are found to not have violated any department of labor regulations it sure is a pain proving that you didn’t!

Sexual harassment is another one of those laws that can get confusing. But what is not confusing is that it is considered a form of gender discrimination. Oregon labor regulations protects against this along with the federal government. The problem is that stupid comments once again will cause you big problems. What may seem like joking today will not tomorrow if you need to take a negative employment action against that person. Everything we have discussed so far should be in your employee handbook. If you don’t have an employment handbook I suggest you get a very good employee handbook templates software that will walk you through step by step.

None of this matters if the employees are under a collective bargaining agreement…

Generally speaking Oregon labor regulations allows you to hire anyone you want provided you do not discriminate. When it comes to promoting or terminating it becomes a little more delicate since Oregon is not known to have an employee at well clause. None of this matters if the employees are under a collective bargaining agreement or any other type of employment contract. If they are not then I would recommend that you consult with a department of labor regulations lawyer, attend labor law training, or purchase a very good employee handbook templates software to assist you in creating policies for such things as a progressive disciplinary program.

Oregon labor regulations covers a number of other employment issues such as overtime requirements, wage and hour laws, smoking in the workplace, child labor, military and family medical leave, etc. For more information about Oregon Department of labor regulations you can contact Oregon’s Bureau of Labor and Industries located in Portland, OR. Their telephone number is 971-673-0761 or their website is www.boli.state.or.us.






Rhode Island Department of Labor Regulations

Like all other states Rhode Island department of labor regulations prohibits the discrimination of various groups of people either prior to employment or after they have been hired. Now some employers may argue that if they were discriminating against someone they would have never hired them in the first place. Well as an example you may have hired someone and then found out that they were a Christian, or were HIV positive!

Under Rhode Island state law the following groups of people are protected against discrimination; someone age forty or over, someone with physical or mental disabilities, someone with AIDS or HIV positive, Gender, someone who is pregnant, childbirth or related medical condition, someone because of their race or color, someone for religious beliefs or creed, someone for their sexual orientation, someone for genetic testing information, someone who was the victim of domestic abuse, or someone for gender identity or expression.

Yes an employer can hire an individual they feel is the best fit for the job but...

Yes an employer can hire an individual they feel is the best fit for the job but it is illegal to discriminate against them. As you can see with the long list of the various groups of people that are protected eventually everyone will fit into one of these groups. Therefore, under Rhode Island department of labor regulations it is wise to make sure your employee handbook clearly states your position on discrimination. However, just stating your position doesn't protect you against someone filing a claim. Typically someone is going to base their claim on an action you took or a reckless statement you made.

Rhode Island department of labor regulations does cover drug testing but it can get very complicated. Unless you fall under a federal regulation my recommendation would be to seriously consider not getting involved in this one. Some exceptions to this would be if your business involves dangerous equipment or the transportation of passengers. In this case you may be mandated by federal law to have a policy and testing program in place and included in your employee handbook. If you do, make sure it complies with Rhode Island and federal law. As with any of the information in this article department of labor regulations can change very rapidly and you are strongly recommended to verify any information provided with a legal professional.

If your business offers vacation pay you may be required to pay...

Regarding the payment of final paychecks Rhode Island department of labor regulations states that whether an employee quits or is terminated they must be paid no later than the next payday. If your business offers vacation pay you may be required to pay that out, but there are some stipulations, such as the employee would have to be employed more than one year. In addition, your vacation benefits would have to be in writing. Remember to verify any statements made with an employment attorney. In addition, most employee handbook templates software also do a great job of complying with most state laws. Ultimately though it is your responsibility to insure you are complying.

Rhode Island department of labor regulations also allows for Continuation of Group Health Insurance Plans offered by any employer. However, because the laws change so quickly I am not going to go in much detail. Just know that if you offer Group Health Insurance to your employees you will be subject to this requirement. Although it is a good law it will require you to administer the plan. Just another word of advice to make sure all your employment policies are fully covered in your employment handbook. If you don't have a handbook I would strongly advise having an employment attorney produce one for you or utilize a reputable employee handbook templates software to assist you.

I can't stress enough that this is an article to make you aware of Rhode Island department of labor regulations and not to act as legal advice in any way. For legal advice you must see or visit with an employment attorney. Department of labor regulations can change every time a court ruling comes down or any other enacted law becomes effective.





South Dakota Department of Labor Regulations

South Dakota department of labor regulations states that it is an employment at will state. An employment at will state simply means that an employee or employer can terminate their employment relationship at any time with or without a reason.

However, don't act too quickly to terminate someone until you understand the entire South Dakota department of labor regulations, since there are several exceptions to the employment at will clause!

If an employee or employer is covered by an employment contract, where the employee and employer are committed to a certain amount of time before they can end their employment relationship, this would supersede the employment at will clause. Another exception would be if the employee is covered under a collective bargaining agreement. This is generally referred to as a Union Contract.

I have personally be threatened in the past by an employer for not violating the law.

Under South Dakota department of labor regulations an employer can't terminate someone for refusing to violate state or federal law. Seems like a no brainer, but I have personally be threatened in the past by an employer for not violating the law. The law does not necessarily have to be a criminal violation. The point is that there are times that an employer can lose sight of right and wrong when it costs them money to do things according to the law.

According to South Dakota department of labor regulations an employer is not permitted to terminate an employee for taking advantage of a lawful right such as filing a workers' compensation claim or an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claim. This does not mean you can't terminate them for another violation such as stealing, but I would not do so unless you have sufficient evidence of the violation. It could be viewed as retaliatory if you are not able to show enough evidence. This is always frightening for an employer when an employee files a claim for an EEO violation; however, if they have been doing something against company policy themselves you may give consideration to terminating them. In addition, an employer may not terminate an employee for serving on a jury.

South Dakota department of labor regulations is also unique in that they protect an individual that smokes

South Dakota department of labor regulations is also unique in that they protect an individual that smokes, or uses any tobacco products on their own time, i.e., off duty in a location other than the workplace. Just like all the other laws there are some exceptions to this law as well. As an example, full time firefighters are one of the exceptions. If the employer has a legitimate reason for placing a requirement on an employee not to smoke at any time, they can make it a condition of employment. I would be very careful to do this without first seeking a South Dakota Department of labor regulations Attorneys opinion.

Of course another reason that would prohibit an employer from terminating an employee is if the employer is discriminating against them. Discrimination includes reasons for color, race, creed, sex, religion, ancestry, age, national origin, or disability. Please understand that this information is not to be considered legal advice. It is merely to assist you in having an understanding of your requirements. Any and all legal questions should be presented to a South Dakota Department of labor regulations Attorney for their professional opinion.

There is no requirement in South Dakota for an employer to provide an employee rest or meal periods.

There is no requirement in South Dakota for an employer to provide an employee rest or meal periods. The employer has the right to make a policy for that benefit on their own. Should they decide to make a policy then they will be required to adhere to it fairly across the board. As an employer I would give great consideration to allowing your employees to rest and or enjoy a meal period depending on how many hours they work. This is important for moral and safety.

South Dakota department of labor regulations also leaves it to the employer to decide on whether they allow for vacation, sick, or holiday pay. Again, if the employer has a policy for any of these they will be required to administer those benefits fairly and consistently to their employees. However, an employer can make the policy so that only certain members 'of the organization are entitled to them, such as only full time employees with more than five years of service. Understand that you can make the policy anyway you wish provided you are not discriminating or violating any other state or federal protections.

If an employee or employer terminates an employee's relationship, the employer is required to issue the employee their final pay no later than the very next scheduled payday. An employer can without pay if the employee has company owned property that must be returned.

Again, please remember to consult with a South Dakota Department of labor regulations Attorney to insure that you are complying with the Department of labor regulations of South Dakota. It will be much less expensive to do that than it will be to defend a position where you violated the department of labor regulations.






Tennessee Department of Labor Regulations

Laws differ from state to state, including Tennessee department of labor regulations. No state can look at another states law and effectively follow it. Tennessee law is no different and it must be followed by the book by all employers and employees.

The Tennessee department of labor regulations rules regarding the workplace cover many different aspects, including the discrimination against women, sexual orientation and religion. There are also regulations regarding how those with disabilities are treated, rights to equal pay and also health and safety regulations. However, there are certain areas that see more court cases than others, which will be covered in this piece.

Discrimination against the gender of an individual was made illegal in 1964, with the Civil Rights Act. It was then adapted in 1991. This not only covers women from being shown prejudice against, it also covers males and transsexuals. This protects the individuals when it comes to pay rises, promotions, training and also the hiring or firing of the certain individuals.

Religious favor is also illegal in the workplace…

The Tennessee department of labor regulations also protects against the victimization of women who are pregnant is actually a form of gender discrimination, however it is looked at under other scopes too. These acts were brought in to help women who are unable to perform all of their job tasks due to their pregnancy. They are to be treated as a short-term disabled employee, which means that their tasks should be modified if possible or they are given different tasks. If a pregnant woman wishes to continue her work rather than go on maternity leave, this should be respected by the employer, as long as the woman in question is able to do their job. Such jobs would include secretarial or desk related work rather than jobs that would require heavy lifting or something strenuous, such as builders, mechanics etc. This act also covers any women who are suffering from an illness that has been related to their pregnancy, such as post-natal depression or complications with the birth.

Religious favor is also illegal in the workplace in accordance with Tennessee department of labor regulations. This includes refusing to hire someone due to their faith or to harass them in the place of work. There are many federal agencies that work with the state governments so that this does not happen, including the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and also the Department of Labor. It is worth noting that employers should accommodate each of the different faith practices where they can. There are cases where if the employer can prove that it was not possible due to the job that practices and dress codes may be restricted. One example would be the Armed Forces.

Prejudice against race and color is the last that is the most commonly reported…

Sexual Harassment is seen in many workplaces and is protected under the gender discrimination in accordance with Tennessee department of labor regulations. This can be towards males and females and it is common to find that many forms of this type of harassment go unreported by males. A description often used in Tennessee states "any unequal treatment of an employee that would not occur but for the employee's gender".

Prejudice against race and color is the last that is the most commonly reported. It includes any bullying due to the race and color during employment and also any special treatment due to the race of the individual or the color of their skin. It also covers co-workers and not just those in charge.

There are many other sections surrounding Tennessee department of labor regulations and it is always worth checking it if you feel that you are being wrongly treated at your job or that one of your co-workers is. The laws are not just to cover discrimination but also cover the rights of an employee when it comes to families, retirement and disabilities as just some examples. Everything can be found on the Internet in an easy to understand fashion.






Texas Labor Law – Quick Facts





Utah Department of Labor Regulations

Utah department of labor regulations is very clear on the subject of employment discrimination. As an employer you need to pay close attention to make sure that you do not cross over the line. Most employers will believe that they would never discriminate against anyone, especially an employee. The problem is that you may unknowingly discriminate by your actions or words. As an example you may make a comment about a potential candidate that is overheard by your staff. The comment may be something as innocent as “She looked like she was pregnant!” Maybe you meant nothing by the comment but if you didn’t hire her someone may believe that you are against a women that is pregnant!

As you may have already guessed Utah department of labor regulations protects women against discrimination for pregnancy, childbirth, or any pregnancy related conditions. In the above example you may never have any direct negative feedback for making the overheard comment; however, you may cause a woman within your organization to be on red alert if they become pregnant. When they do and you take any negative action against them for any reason you may be faced with a claim of discrimination. An employee will have a great memory when it could impact them down the road. Therefore, keep your comments to yourself even if you think no one is listening.

How do I comply with the law so that I don’t get in trouble?

The Utah department of labor regulations follows the Antidiscrimination & Labor Division’s Employment Discrimination who is charged with administering and enforcing the Utah Antidiscrimination Act of 1965. If you’re like me all you want to know is how do I comply with the law so that I don’t get in trouble down the road! Right! It is very simple! Don’t discriminate against anyone for any reason, or give them a reason to believe you are discriminating against them! Utah department of labor regulations states that the following groups are protected; age, race, color, national origin, religion, disability, gender, and as mentioned above pregnancy, childbirth, or pregnancy related conditions. Please make sure you have placed your position on discrimination in your employee handbook. If you don’t have an employee handbook produce one with a reputable Good Leadership Skills software program! Don’t be a fool and not have one!

Although for the most part the Utah department of labor regulations allows an employer to hire anyone they wish so long as you do not discriminate against them. With the exception of making stupid and uncalled for comments you would have to struggle a great deal to violate this department of labor regulations. Let me give you another example of how stupid people can be when interviewing a potential candidate. You may get on the subject of children because the candidate brought it up. During that discussion you may inadvertently ask the candidate if they are planning on having children. Now you possessed the question because you absolutely adore children. When you don’t hire them they may believe that it was due to them stating they wanted to have children. As innocent as it is you could be facing an investigation for discrimination! It’s that simple! Stay focused during an interview!

If you tell me that it will make it easier to terminate someone you don’t like, then you are just flat lazy and maybe border line dumb!

Utah department of labor regulations is considered an employment “at-will” state. An employment at will means that unless an employee is under a collective bargaining agreement or an employment contract an employer and hire, fire, promoted, or any other employment action with or without a reason. Of course an employee can also leave the company without any reason as well. However, once an employer suggests that an employee will be employed unless they do something wrong the “at will” clause may go out the window! Many employers don’t want to hear this, but let’s look at it a little more clearly before we decide that we want to stick with the employment “at will” clause!

I mentioned earlier that you would be a fool to conduct and run a business without an employee handbook. I stand behind that statement and still suggest that you use an Good Leadership Skills software program to assist you in that process. However, some would say, and are probably more correct than not, that by having an employee handbook you throw the at will employee clause out the window. But why in the world would you want to terminate an employee if they are producing for you. If you tell me that it will make it easier to terminate someone you don’t like, then you are just flat lazy and maybe border line dumb. You certainly begin to risk the discrimination claim by terminating someone you don’t like. Almost everyone at some point in their life will fall into one of the groups of people that are protected.

Wouldn’t it make more sense if you are going to go to all the trouble, time and expense of recruiting, hiring, training, and developing a productive professional relationship with an employee to keep them around unless they are not producing or violate any of your company rules/policies? As an example if they steal or fight, then that is cause for termination and you are protected unless you don’t document the incident! If they are not producing and are no longer a good value to your organization after you have documented an effort to correct the problem it may be time to let them go. Utah department of labor regulations should have no problem with this, again provided you have documented your efforts to correct the problem.

This is referred to as progressive discipline and should be a part of your employee handbook. Utah department of labor regulations or any state for that matter understands that as long as you do not discriminate and can provide evidence that you are treating everyone equally and fairly they should have no problem with your employment actions. Now this is a simple article and requires much more in-depth discussion to cover any of these above subjects fully. However, this should give you a good start! Remember however, that the Good Leadership Skills website is not a source of legal advice and should not be considered to be that at all. Our suggestion is to use a good Good Leadership Skills software and/or a department of labor regulations employment lawyer to assist you with all your Utah department of labor regulations issues.





Vermont Department of Labor Regulations

Vermont department of labor regulations requires that most employers pay employees overtime for all hours over forty in one work week. The required overtime rate is one and one half times the employee’s regular hourly rate. However, in Vermont there are some types of businesses that are exempt from this requirement. The following is a list of some of those types (retail or service) of businesses; restaurants, hotels, certain types of amusement parks and recreational establishments. Be careful though because just because certain types of businesses may be exempt from paying overtime according to Vermont department of labor regulations they may not be according to the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act. So make sure you check before taking action and include your position in your employee handbook. Of course any of the above is tossed out if the employee is protected by a contract or a collective bargaining agreement!

The Vermont department of labor regulations does allow for an employer to pay wages via direct deposit provided the employee has given written authorization. The financial institution can be inside or outside the state of Vermont. Like any policy regarding an employees pay it is important that you receive very accurate information of the employees banking information. In addition, with the issues today regarding identity theft it is critical that you have a payroll software and computer system that protects the employee’s information. One slip up and it could be devastating!

This simply means that an employer can hire, fire, promote, or take any other employment action with or without reasons.

Vermont department of labor regulations does not require an employer to provide for paid or unpaid time off for any holidays. However, the employer can provide this benefit if they so choose. In addition, if the employee is under a contract or a collective bargaining agreement then that must be followed. In addition, employers are not required to provide any other paid or unpaid time off for vacation, sick, or severance. There are exceptions to this also, such as, the Family Medical Leave Act which does provide for protections to the employee for qualified situations. Hopefully you include this in your employee handbook so there are no questions, especially if the employee files a claim with the state. Your handbook will make it clear what your position is.

Vermont department of labor regulations falls considers employees to be “at will”. This simply means that an employer can hire, fire, promote, or take any other employment action with or without reasons. However, if the employer is discriminating against any employee this is considered illegal and is actionable. Of course employees can also leave the company without notice as well. There are some advantages to having an “at will” employee; however, I am not inclined to follow this path. I would rather take the progressive discipline approach which means that I will only take negative actions against employees for good cause. There are risks for legal action no matter which position you take. My belief is that if I have gone through the trouble and expense of the recruitment process, training that employee, and investing my time, then I want that employee to be successful. None of this is that important if you have a good probationary period policy within your employee handbook. The amount of time you elect to have an employee under a probationary period is your choice. This allows you to decide during that time if you want to keep the employee or let them go! Please consult with a labor law attorney before making a decision!

This of course will insure that the health and safety of the employee is protected.

Vermont department of labor regulations does require an employer to provide a reasonable opportunity for an employee to eat and use the restroom. This of course will insure that the health and safety of the employee is protected. Some of this will be determined by the amount of time the employee is scheduled to work. However, based on this labor law I would at a minimum provide a reasonable opportunity for an employee to use the restroom. If it becomes excessive the employee may be ill and may need to be excused from work. This is only my opinion and not legal advice. An employer must pay for time taken to use the restroom or eat lunch unless the time allowed is thirty minutes or longer and was not in any way interrupted. This is not cumulative time, i.e., ten minutes here and five minutes there until thirty minutes is taken. The time must be all at the same time. Please include this in your employee handbook so there are no questions about your policy. This could help if legally challenged.

Vermont department of labor regulations only allows for an employer to deduct from an employee’s paycheck those items permitted or required by law. As an example that would include taxes and social security. In addition, with the written authorization of the employee for such things as health





West Virginia Department of Labor Regulations

The West Virginia department of labor regulations follows the federal law when it comes to some of the hiring processes. As an example employers do not have to hire the most qualified candidate; however, they are not permitted to base their decision on personal characteristics that are not job related. Some of these characteristics are; race, age, religion, sex, national origin, or a disability.

During the interview process the employer must not ask certain questions that have nothing to do with the position. Just to list a few of these questions that are not permitted are; Do you have children?, Where were you born?, Are you married or are you planning on getting married? As you can see questions like these would not and should not matter to the employer. Even though you can not ask someone if they have ever been arrested you can ask if they have ever been convicted of a crime. It might be wise to have a question like this on your job application and include you stance on this within your employee handbook.

The key point to this is that the information must be true and accurate…

Please remember that the Employee Handbook Templates website is not permitted to offer legal advice; therefore, it is critical that you seek out your own legal professional to verify any and all department of labor regulations including the West Virginia department of labor regulations.

When giving a reference to a previous employee the West Virginia department of labor regulations permits an employer to give information provided it is not confidential. The key point to this is that the information must be true and accurate. Therefore if you are providing information, especially if it is negative in nature, that you have the necessary proof to back it up. That is exactly why many previous employers limit the information they give to only dates or employment. They do not want to risk a legal claim for something like defamation of character. It simply is not worth it.

The West Virginia department of labor regulations also addresses ”at will” employees. An “at will” employee is generally an employee who is not working under an employment contract. Although this suggests that an “at will” employee can be terminated for any legal reason, it probably is not a wise choice in most cases. On the other hand an employer is not permitted to terminate an “at will” employee for illegal reasons. For instance an employer is not permitted to discriminate against anyone or to terminate someone because they will not violate a law. In turn they would not be permitted to terminate someone in retaliation for filing a claim. It is very important that you include a statement regarding an “at will” employment relationship within their employee handbook. However, it is important that you consult a legal professional before moving forward with an employee handbook.

It would be wise to work with a legal professional that provides employee handbook templates…

The West Virginia department of labor regulations and specifically the Safety & Loss Control Unit of the West Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission is commissioned to provide a safe, healthy and free of hazards workplace for employees within their state. State and federal law requires that employers provide a safe place for employee’s that is free of known hazards.

There are more issues covered by the West Virginia department of labor regulations that employers must be familiar with. It is very important that you inform your employee’s of the employment policies. One of the best ways to do this would be to have an employee handbook; however, it would be wise to work with a legal professional that provides employee handbook templates that meet your state requirements. One statement would be to make sure it addresses your position on an employee “at will”.




Wyoming Department of Labor Regulations

Wyoming department of labor regulations has nothing that dictates that an employer must pay overtime. However, federal department of labor regulations does! In Wyoming this means that federal department of labor regulations would prevail and employers are required to pay non exempt employees for any hours over forty in one work week. A work week is determined by the employer but can't be changed for the sole reason of avoiding the payment of overtime. As an example a work week may be set as Sunday at 12:01 am until the following Saturday at midnight. An employer should determine if an assigned work schedule begins in one pay period and ends in another which one it falls into. Overtime is paid at 1.5 times the employee's regular wages.

Whether Wyoming law is silent when it comes to overtime or not, federal department of labor regulations does not include paying overtime to exempt employees. Please refer to my information on what constitutes an exempt employee. However, in Wyoming the type of employees are expanded since it is primarily an agricultural state. This means that some farm workers may be included as exempt. In either case I would make sure that I consulted a Wyoming Department of labor regulations Attorney for their opinion. You do not want to risk having to go back and pay days, weeks, months, or even years of over time because you misunderstood who should be considered an exempt employee.

Wyoming department of labor regulations does not require an employer to offer benefits when it comes to such things as vacation pay, sick pay, holiday pay...

Wyoming law does not require an employer to offer benefits when it comes to such things as vacation pay, sick pay, holiday pay, severance pay, health and welfare benefits, etc. However, if you do offer these any of these benefits you must administer them fairly and consistently. This means that you can't determine who receives or does not receive them based on a discriminatory practice. A discriminatory practice would be something such as offering them to everyone except someone that is in one of these protected classes; race, sex, age, national origin, religion, disability, color, etc. You can base your decision on many other factors such as how long someone has been at your organization or what job they are filling. Again, once you have made a decision you must be fair and consistent.

Wyoming department of labor regulations is an employment at will state. This is very common across the United States. An employment at will state means that an employee or employer can terminated their employment relationship at will for any reason or no reason provided it does not violate state or federal law. Some violations would be for discriminatory practices as mentioned above. It could also mean that if an employee and employer were covered under an employment contract or collective bargaining agreement. There are a number of other exceptions and I would strongly recommend that you consult with a Wyoming Department of labor regulations Attorney for specific questions you have.

If your employer demands that you fire someone because they are black

Other reasons Wyoming department of labor states for not being permitted to terminate an employee at will would be if an employee refuses to violate state or federal law. As an example if your employer demands that you fire someone because they are black or they will fire you, you would be protected. The real question becomes if you can prove that this was the case. I know that in the past I was threatened for not violating a state law and fortunately the employer withdrew their demand. This becomes a very sensitive situation and I feel for anyone that is placed in it. Again, trying ~o prove that the employer made that demand can become difficult depending on the demand.

Remember that this information on Wyoming department of labor regulations is not intended to be taken as legal advice. It is simply some general information on state and federal department of labor regulations. In any case I would always consult with a department of labor regulations attorney for their opinion.

Thank you and May God Bless You!

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